Hanging Herb Garden

Designer: Anna Marino

Up to 12 herbs can grow in this clever hanging planter.


Materials:

  • 47×50″ piece of chalkboard fabric
  • 2—35×38″ pieces of landscape fabric
  • Tape: masking or duct
  • Heavy-duty sewing thread: black
  • Heavy-duty sewing machine needle
  • Crafts knife
  • Cutting mat
  • Metal straightedge
  • 112“-diameter dowel 50” long
  • Chalk
  • Herb starter plants

MEASURE AND MARK THE GRID

1. Lay chalkboard fabric right side up on work surface with 47″ sides at top and bottom.

2. Referring to the Fabric Marking Diagram, measure 612” from the top edge of the fabric. Using a pencil, mark an A line across the width of the fabric.

3. Measure 512” in from each side edge and mark D lines along the length of the fabric.

4. Measure 5″ down from the A line and mark a B line across the fabric from D line to D line.

5. Measure 512” above bottom edge of the fabric and mark a C line across the fabric from D line to D line.

6. Measure 11″ below the B line, and mark an E line from D line to D line. Measure and mark another E line 11″ below the first E line.

7. Measure 9″ from a D line and mark a vertical F line from B line to C line. Measure and mark two more F lines so all are 9″ apart, making a grid of 12 rectangles.


STITCH AND CUT THE OPENINGS

1. Referring to Diagram 1, measure 5″ from the top of each grid rectangle and mark a 6×1″ rectangle in the center (112” from D Line and F Line). Repeat for each rectangle.

2. Turn fabric over with right side facedown. Measure 412” from the bottom edge and mark a line across the width of the fabric.

3. Referring to Diagram 2, lay one piece of landscape fabric on the wrong side of the chalkboard fabric with a 38″ edge of the landscape fabric centered along the marked line. There should be 4″ space between chalkboard fabric and landscape fabric edges along each side. Tape all landscape fabric edges to wrong side of chalkboard fabric.

4. Turn chalkboard fabric over with right side up. To secure layers, stitch on marked 6×1″ rectangle through both fabric layers in each of the 12 grid rectangles (Diagram 3).

5. Place layered piece with chalkboard fabric right side up on cutting mat. Using a crafts knife and a straightedge, cut through center of a stitched 6×1″ rectangle as shown in Diagram 4, angling cuts to each corner of stitching; cut right up to, but not through, the stitching. Repeat in each grid rectangle.

 

6. Referring to Diagram 5, fold under the cut edges inside each 6×1″ rectangle to make an opening. Topstitch around each opening through both fabric layers. Repeat for all 12 grid rectangles.

 

7. Turn layered piece over with landscape fabric side up. Repeat Step 3, positioning the second piece of landscape fabric on top of the first.

8. Turn layered piece over with chalkboard fabric side up. Stitch along all D and F lines; then stitch all B, E, and C lines to complete grid.

9. Turn layered piece over with landscape fabric side up. Turn and sew a 12” hem along each side edge. Sew a 1″ hem along bottom edge.

10. On wrong side of chalkboard fabric, measure and mark 612” from top edge (same as A line on front). Fold top fabric edge down to A line. Sew edge in place to create a hanging sleeve.

11. Insert dowel into hanging sleeve. Label each grid pocket using chalk. Insert herbs starter plants into grid slits. Embellish with chalk lettering as desired.

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Festive Outdoor Hanging Decor

spoon-ballsDesigner: Jan Carlson

Turn red plastic spoons from the party supply store into dimensional accents to hang above a door.


Materials:

  • 5″-diameter plastic-foam ball
  • Spray paint: red
  • Plastic spoons: 200 red
  • Wire cutters
  • Glidden Gripper primer paint
  • Foam paintbrush
  • Burlap ribbon: natural
  • Fishing line
  • Hot-glue gun and glue sticks

Assemble the Decor:

1. Use wire cutters to snip the handles off the red spoons, leaving 3″ of each neck intact.

2. Brush Glidden Gripper primer paint onto the neck of one spoon. While the paint is wet, push the painted spoon neck into the foam ball. Repeat with a second spoon on the opposite side of the foam ball. Continue adding spoons to alternating sides until the entire ball is covered with spoons. Let dry.

3. Cut a 36″ length of burlap ribbon and tie the ends together to make a loop. Tie a length of fishing line around the spoons; tie into a knot. Tie the other end to the burlap ribbon loop. If desired, make a large burlap bow and hot-glue it to the burlap loop.

Macramé Plant Hanger

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Designer: Kristina Clemens

 

Treat your potted plants to a simple knotted sling that’s a blast from the macramé past.


Materials:

  • 10 yards of cording, twine, or paracord
  • 1 14” metal ring or key ring
  • 6″ tall ceramic planter

 

1. Cut four 90″-long cording strands and lay together in a group. Thread all the strands through the metal ring, and tie the centers of the strands to the ring (Diagram 1).

 

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2. Split the strands into four sections of two strands each. Tie each section with an overhand knot approximately 8″ below the top knot (Diagram 2).

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3. Split the tails below each knot and join tails from adjacent knots with an overhand knot approximately 3–4″ below the knots from Step 2. (Diagram 3).

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4. Group all tails together and knot them with a large overhand knot that will hold the planter in place (Diagram 4).

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5. Insert planter into hanger. Trim tails to desired length.

How to Build a Terrarium

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If weeding and constant care of a large outdoor garden seem overwhelming, tend to easy-care plants housed inside a glass jar instead.


Learn to Layer:

 

A) A foundation of gravel, crystals, or other decorative rock will aid drainage. Mix in a handful of horticultural charcoal to keep the terrarium odor-free.

B) Moisture-loving plants need a good indoor potting soil. If using succulents, choose suitable soil.

C) Top-dress the soil with a layer of moss to help retain moisture and provide an attractive finishing touch.

D) Use dwarf plants that enjoy low light and high humidity. Good choices include Boston fern, strawberry begonia, gold club moss, and aquamarine.

 

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Do you have a terrarium? Share pics with us on Instagram with #miymaglife!